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2017 APDIM Program Administrators Meeting Workshop Descriptions

Workshop Session I

Workshop Session II

Workshop Session III

All workshops will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis; all rooms will be set for maximum capacity.

Pre-registering for a workshop does not guarantee a reserved seat in that workshop.

Download all workshop descriptions for 2017 APDIM Program Administrators Meeting (PDF). 

Workshop Session I
Sunday, March 19, 2017
9:45 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

101. Connecting Passion with Purpose: Creating a Roadmap to Reach Your Full Potential
Finding your “purpose” in life can feel like an intimidating task. The theory of authentic leadership suggests that what you loved to do as a child has everything to do with what you love about your job or personal life now. Purpose shows up in many ways and places and helps you identify your core passion. Under times of duress, being able to articulate why you are doing what you are doing is a resource. Those who are aware of their purpose and sense of meaning tend to be more resilient and able to see past current challenges. Additionally, going from gut purpose to articulated purpose allows one to more accurately assess opportunities for the future as well as tilt current work toward what energizes them.

Participants will work in small groups to recognize their passions and create a roadmap to apply their authentic impact statement to their everyday practice. This workshop aims to help participants develop their impact statement with a positive psychology coaching tool designed to help them discover what is already there but is rarely uncovered. The goal for this workshop is for participants to end with an impact statement about themselves…”I am a person who loves X, Y, and Z and I am at my best when I am A, B, and C.” Further, work in small groups will develop a specific action plan, including milestone markers, to achieve these goals in both their personal and professional lives.

Educational Objectives:

  • Identify the importance of authentic leadership and connecting passion and purpose.
  • Develop impact statement incorporating authentic talents and purpose.
  • Develop short and long term goals and strategies to implement impact statement.

Crys S. Draconi
Tufts Medical Center

Kerri Palamara, MD
Harvard Medical School Massachusetts General Hospital


102. Raising the Bar: Stronger Recruitment Based on the Art of Persuasion
In this workshop, you will learn about Cialdini’s six principles of persuasion and the science of influence. While the business world routinely uses these principles in marketing, these principles are not commonly used by residency programs as a tool to analyze a program’s recruitment process and the applicant experience during recruitment. Residency programs allot many resources to recruitment but rarely consider the application of the principles of the science of persuasion to identifying areas for improvement in the program’s recruitment process. During the workshop, we will demonstrate how to apply these principles to the residency interview process to positively impact residency program marketing and the applicant experience during the residency interview process. We will begin with an overview of the six principles, followed by a review of data regarding applicant expectations of the interview process and factors that influence residency program selection. We will connect how the six principles of persuasion can be applied to meet applicant expectations. The audience will engage by sharing and discussing common applicant feedback on the recruitment process. We will facilitate categorizing this feedback into the six principles of persuasion framework. This framework will then be used by small groups of audience members to identify strategies to improve program marketing and the applicant recruitment experience. We will end by sharing how our program has used the six principles of persuasion to improve the applicant interview experience in our own residency program.

Educational Objectives:

  • Learn about the six principles of persuasion and the science of influence as a tool to identify improvements in the marketing of a residency program and the applicant experience during recruitment.
  • Learn about applicant expectations of the interview process and how to align applicant expectations with the six principles of persuasion.
  • Apply the six principles of persuasion to your current interview process and identify areas within your interview process that can be enhanced by the application of these six principles.

Cuc Mai, MD
Brad Clark
Candice Mateja, DO
University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine


103. Developing a Culture of Coordinator Collaboration
The discussion of this session will be focused on the necessity and importance of developing and nurturing a collaborative environment between graduate medical education coordinators. Informal and formal methods of collaboration will be addressed. Additionally, it will be looked at from the perspective of the benefits to the organization collaboration can provide in terms of efficiency and effectiveness as well as increased job satisfaction.

Educational Objectives:

  • Understand the value of collaboration.
  • Gain tools in the form of informal methods of collaboration.
  • Gain tools in the form of formal methods of collaboration.

Weronika V. Mansfield
Sarah Laing
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine


104. CCC “Dashboard”: Creating Individual Comprehensive Residency Performance Reports to Assist the CCC committee in Effectively Evaluating Residents
In this session, we will describe the process for creating individual comprehensive resident performance reports (RPR) to assist the CCC committee in effectively evaluating residents. Our goal was to streamline the organization of the data used to evaluate each resident during the semi-annual CCC meeting. To accomplish this goal, we created a dashboard-style RPR. The RPR tool includes data from our program’s evaluation management software as well as external data points. It is a malleable tool that can be catered to any program’s needs. During the workshop, we plan to briefly discuss the data points included in our RPR and how to develop an RPR to fit your program. We will then provide a sample RPR and explain the process of creating a spreadsheet to house the data as well as develop templates for your RPR—and how to merge the two.

Educational Objectives:

  • Determine data points that can he used to enhance the evaluation of residents and to which competency they are applicable.
  • Create a spreadsheet to organize resident performance data.
  • Develop templates for resident performance reports for each PGY year to use in conjunction with the data.

Danielle Priester
Thomas Holmes, MD
Advocate Lutheran General Hospital

105. Surviving the Self-Study Process
This workshop is a review of the ACGME Self-Study process in a large university-based internal medicine department with 12 subspecialty programs. ACGME has placed added responsibility for oversight of subspecialty programs on the core program, making coordination between programs key. We will share our methods of streamlining the self-study process to be effective and minimally invasive.

Topics will include breaking it down into manageable pieces; making a timeline; coordinating the core program with subspecialties to present a cohesive overview of the department’s educational mission; utilizing the data you already have; getting broad representation; available resources; and lessons learned. We will share materials that we used.

Educational Objectives:

  • Explain the process and timeline of the ACGME Self-Study, including how to form a plan to coordinate activities between the core program and the dependent subspecialty programs.
  • Explain how to use the self-study to affect change in programs.
  • List resources to support the self-study, both internal and external.

Bethany Millar
Megan Wren, MD
Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

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Workshop Session II
Monday, March 20, 2017
9:45 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.

201. TAGME Certification Workshop
This workshop will provide attendees with the latest information regarding the TAGME certification process for administrators of graduate medical education and will indicate how recent changes in the process have impacted the application and assessment components of certification. Professional development and benefits of certification will also be discussed. Attendees will receive tips on preparing for the assessment process.

Educational Objectives:

  • Understand the recent changes in the certification process and how those changes effect their individual plans to seek certification and will be familiar with all components of the certification process.
  • Recognize the benefits of certification and how it plays a role in personal professional development and career opportunities.
  • Understand the application and preparation process for certification.

Cheryl H. Moss
University of Mississippi School of Medicine

Joanne Battaglia
Orlando Health

Rebecca Young
Aurora Health

202. Book Club: Black Man in A White Coat
In the medical profession, divisions exist among young minority medical students. Residency programs around the country create committees and subcommittees to increase diversity among their trainees. This workshop is designed as a book club; participants will be expected to have read the New York Times Bestseller Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflection on Race and Medicine, by Damon Tweedy, MD. In his memoir, Dr. Tweedy addresses challenges with which he is continually faced with throughout his medical career and how race directly impacts his interactions with patients. Diagnoses are the direct outcome of social, culture, and economic facet of patient care. Workshop participants will reflect in small group discussions.

Educational Objectives:

  • Bring diversity awareness to medical schools and residency programs.
  • Address the ongoing binary challenges that exist in the medical profession.
  • Instigate equality to training programs directly impacting patient care.

Mary Sarah Thanas
Yale-New Haven Medical Center (Primary Care)

Britt Simonson
Harvard Medical School Brigham and Women’s Hospital

203. Failed Remediation: Next Uneasy Steps and Consequences of Letting a Resident Go
This workshop will focus on details about difficult decisions which need to be made after failed remediation process and performance improvement plans. The workshop will be an interactive discussion and will highlight steps from failed remediation to suspension of residents. It will highlight the difficulty in decision making for program directors and CCCs. It will suggest the processes and preparation to deal with those situations. It will explain how academic decisions can be streamlined with legal requirements at program and institutional level. The workshop will be an opportunity for program directors and faculty in attendance to share their experience or concerns on the topic. Authors have been involved in designing the process for their own institution. They will share experience and success of design. Finally the conclusion of the workshop will include clear suggestions for developing policies and procedures to deal with suspension and removal of residents in various situations. It provides opportunity to prepare for legal aspects of this path.

Educational Objectives:

  • Prepare program policy to deal with failed remediation and determine the process for removal and suspension of a resident.
  • Align remediation policy of program with institutional policies and simplify due process.
  • Develop a process which can be understood by all learners from the beginning.
  • Deal with legal consequences of suspension or removal of a resident.

Ateeq U. Rehman, MD
Emily Ciula, MD
Saqib Mahmud, MD
Marshfield Clinic-St. Joseph’s Hospital


204. The ABCs of Quality Improvement: Learning How to Implement Various Quality Improvement Models in an Administration Setting
Change within programs is evitable and constant. From simple changes—such as implementing a new form—to complex changes, such as putting a process into motion, it requires the buy-in of many people and warrants tracking. From an administrator’s point of view implementation of these changes do not need to be scary or stressful. Rather, implementation can be as easy as ABC. This workshop will introduce participants to the: clinical quality improvement (QI) models and apply them to the program office setting: Care Model, Lean Model, Improvement Model (PDSA), FADE Model, and Six Sigma. Additionally, participants will put into practice a few of these models while in small groups and apply three of the most commonly used models using various scenarios faced by program administrators. The small groups will then discuss their process, pros and cons of each model and learn the benefits of standardized means of implementation and monitoring of practical program change.

Educational Objectives:

  • Identify various QI models.
  • Select the most appropriate model for any given situation.
  • Develop plans for change, using the appropriate QI model.

Crys S. Draconi
Tufts Medical Center

Raagini Jawa, MD
Boston University School of Medicine


205. Accountability In the Workplace: Don’t Sink My Battleship!
Taking ownership of workplace responsibilities at every level is crucial in establishing a culture of high performance. This workshop will discuss the important role that administrators play in ensuring accountability in both themselves and others. Setting and maintaining high standards to continuously drive an organization towards results can be an exhaustive effort. The continuous battle of ensuring accountability is akin to running a marathon with no finish line. During the session, we will explore ways to maintain personal resolve in this challenging environment of competing demands. We will examine barriers to performance and discuss strategies to overcome.

Educational Objectives:

  • Discuss the many layers of accountability and how it impacts an organization.
  • Explore the barriers that hinder performance.
  • Gain new tools for realigning sidetracked intentions and maintaining personal resolve.

Laurie Dubois
Boston University School of Medicine

John D. Buckley, MD
Indiana University School of Medicine

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Workshop Session III
Monday, March 20, 2017
11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

301. Using Multiple Mini Interviews in Residency Recruitment
McMaster University Medical School developed the multiple mini interview (MMI) system and formally introduced it in 2004 as part of their medical school recruitment process. MMIs are now widely used in medical schools across the country for interviewing medical student candidates. MMIs assess non-cognitive skills, such as interpersonal skills, professionalism, and ethical/moral judgment. We incorporated MMIs as part of our residency recruitment process and have been very pleased with the results. This workshop will outline the goal of MMIs, how to train your faculty and staff to conduct these interviews, how to schedule them as part of your interview day, review the MMI question bank, and look at the results of programs using MMIs for residency recruitment.

Educational Objectives:

  • Learn the history of MMI and its usefulness in the residency recruitment and selection process.
  • Learn how to train faculty and staff to conduct MMIs.
  • Learn how to evaluate applicants on their MMI performance and incorporate this evaluation into the final ranking process.

Rodi Antoinette Marcelle
Albany Medical College


302. Academic and Community Hospitals Connect: Fundamental Building Blocks for an Effective Training Plan to Assist New Coordinators and Managers to Build a Collaborative Team
The role of the education program coordinator is critical to any training program. It is a complex and nuanced one and has evolved with the Next Accreditation System and Clinical Learning Environment Review requirements. The program coordinator plays a wide range of roles: supervisor, manager, scheduler, data collector, rule enforcer, etc. Training the program coordinator can be challenging due to the nature of the irregularity of specific tasks across the academic year and is complex due to specific requirements unique to each training program. This session will focus on ways to train new coordinators to help overcome the learning curve. We will share ideas and instruction on creating academic year timelines and toolkits, setting the stage for meaningful collaboration with colleagues, and structuring an effective training plan for new coordinators. This session will provide insight from two perspectives, one from the perspective of a university-based institution and the other from a community hospital perspective.

Educational Objectives:

  • Identify the complexity of the skills and tools needed for effective training from two perspectives.
  • Understand how to create an ideal and effective training environment for new coordinators.
  • Describe innovative methods of training, collaboration, and communication to ensure the dissemination of valuable information.

Brittany Arrowsmith
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (Jacksonville)


303. Threading the Needle and Moving the Needle: Data and the CCC
Residency program administrators track many data points for each resident in their program which are reported to the program director. This information may be required for a resident’s training and advancement to the next PGY level and be relevant to the ACGME and ABIM, while some data points are more specific to the institution. Examples of such data points include certifications, completion of USMLE, completion of educational modules, completion of evaluations, and completion of patient care records. In addition, procedures completed and required for ABIM certification eligibility are tracked within a program and reported upon graduation. Resident compliance with timely completion of these activities is a measure of professionalism.

In the Next Accreditation System, residency programs and their CCC must report on each resident’s milestone progress in the six competency areas. Our residency program uses 360 degree information in each resident’s CCC review, including data obtained from an administration standpoint to standardize the scoring of patient care milestone PC4, PBLI milestone PBLI1, and professionalism milestone PROF2. Use of currently tracked information prevents duplication of efforts during a CCC meeting and standardization of data helps to inform decisions on milestone progress.

Educational Objectives:

  • Demonstrate how data points collected by program administrators provide useful information for a CCC for particular milestones.
  • Demonstrate a method used to standardize scoring of particular resident milestones using existing data allowing for consistency in scoring.
  • Provide an adaptable framework illustrating incorporation of program data into the CCC and standardization of milestone scoring.

Kimberly Kranz, MD
Linda Colosi
Susan Lane, MD
Stony Brook University School of Medicine


304. Surviving the Self-Study Process
This workshop is a review of the ACGME Self-Study process in a large university-based internal medicine department with 12 subspecialty programs. ACGME has placed added responsibility for oversight of subspecialty programs on the core program, making coordination between programs key. We will share our methods of streamlining the self-study process to be effective and minimally invasive.

Topics will include breaking it down into manageable pieces; making a timeline; coordinating the core program with subspecialties to present a cohesive overview of the department’s educational mission; utilizing the data you already have; getting broad representation; available resources; and lessons learned. We will share materials that we used.

Educational Objectives:

  • Explain the process and timeline of the ACGME Self-Study, including how to form a plan to coordinate activities between the core program and the dependent subspecialty programs.
  • Explain how to use the self-study to affect change in programs.
  • List resources to support the self-study, both internal and external.

Bethany Millar
Megan Wren, MD
Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine


305. Increasing Program Diversity: Recruiting to Make a Difference
Workshop description and educational objectives TBD

Kelly Spielmann
Karen A. Friedman, MD
Johanna Martinez, MD
Nichol Martinez, MD
Matthew Sinclair, MD
Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine at Hofstra University

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